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Using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting in Preclinical and Clinical Research

Many researchers across biomedical disciplines face a situation when they need to isolate a pure population of cells. They might be stem cells for basic research or a patient’s T cells that can be engineered to attack their own tumor. The many uses for pure cell populations in both the preclinical and clinical research has created a demand for techniques that preserve the viability and functionality of cells and optimize the purity of the cell population of interest. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) is a flow cytometry-based technique that is the workhorse of biomedical research because it can satisfy these criteria.

This white paper highlights the many applications of FACS in both basic and clinical research, and how cell sorting techniques can be customized for the
specific downstream uses of the sorted cells.

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  • Using Flourescence Activated Cell Sorting In Preclinical Research Page 1
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  • Using Flourescence Activated Cell Sorting In Preclinical Research Page 6
Using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting in Preclinical and Clinical Research


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